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Can I be prosecuted for just for talking about having sex with a minor over the internet?

Answer:

Yes, you can. The prosecution of those looking to have sex with a minor over the internet has exploded in recent years. These cases are easy to prosecute: police officers pose as underage minors (or the minor's parents) and get people to make incriminating statements. Then, they arrest them; the prison sentences are long. And the entire crime is a complete fiction, since there was no possibility for the minors or those seeking them out to actually meet, because the 'minors' are actually police officers. But how can someone be prosecuted for attempting to commit a crime which could actually never come to pass? As a Jacksonville criminal defense attorney, I have seen it happen.

Can the police question a child at school without a parent?

Answer:

Probably, yes, the police can question a child at school without a parent present. In J.D.B. v. North Carolina, a 13 year old, seventh grade student was accused of breaking into two homes. A few days after the break-ins, a school resource officer took the student from his classroom to a conference room in the school where two police officers and two school administrators questioned him for 30 minutes. The student, incredibly, was not given his Miranda warnings, nor was he given the opportunity to call his grandmother, who was his legal guardian, nor was he told he was free to leave the room if he wished. Eventually, he confessed to the crimes he was accused of, in part because he was scared after being threatened with juvenile detention. He was told to write out a statement, which he did. He was then permitted to leave and catch his bus home. Sometime thereafter, he was charged with breaking and entering and larceny. As a Jacksonville criminal defense attorney, I represent juveniles charged with crimes.

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